Mamas on Bedrest: Vote!

October 11th, 2016
image by coward_lion, courtesy of

image by coward_lion, courtesy of

Hello Mamas,

It’s not lost on any of us that this election season is one of the hottest messes in US election history! I’m not going to tell you who to vote for, or argue the virtues of either candidate. Who you decide to vote for is your personal business and let’s keep it that way. However, I am going to encourage you to vote. As an African American woman, I recognize the sacrifices-to the death for some-made so that I may “use my voice to make a choice!” The women who marched and protested in the 1920’s made it possible for women to vote. But for me and mine, this right was finally granted after many hotly contested, and a few bloody battles waged during the 1960’s. Knowing this history, knowing how many struggled and sacrificed, I can’t not vote! I know that many of you may be frustrated and disgusted. I know that much of what is going on is discouraging to say the least. But if we don’t vote, I fear dire consequences for our country. So please exercise your constitutional right and cast your opinions as to who and how this country should be governed.

Now I’m sure a lot of you will look at this post and think, “Now what in the h–l has voting got to do with being on bedrest?” While the presidential election has most certainly taken up much of the country’s attention, and who is elected president is surely of high importance, it most certainly isn’t the only election that matters to “We the People” and in many instances it isn’t the most important election for we Mamas on Bedrest. There is a lot of legislation pending in many states and local governments that will be approved/disapproved depending on who is elected in November-from the president on down. Very crucial legislation on paid family leave, employer sponsored benefits, health care, wage equality, childcare and other issues all crucial to us as mamas are all being considered by legislators in all 50 states and US protectorates. Implementation of these pending legislations will vary depending on the state, so if you don’t vote, if you don’t participate in this process, there is a strong likelihood that what you want to happen won’t. Perhaps you feel that your vote won’t matter. I get that. I live in Texas a very red state with conservative legislators diametrically opposed to what I believe. Yet, I will still be voting-even if it seems a useless proposition in some cases-because there are some instances in which legislation will narrowly be approved or rejected based on just a few votes. We can be deciding votes.

Many of you may be thinking, “I can’t vote, I’m on bedrest.” This is not true. You can vote by absentee ballot in all states, you simply have to request a mail-in ballot and return it by the date your state’s election board indicates.

I googled “absentee voting” and this link popped up with step by step information on how to obtain a ballot and submit it to your state’s elections office. If you don’t feel comfortable with this link, check out the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s absentee voting page. It too has very useful information about how one can vote if one is unable to physically get to the polls. Today, October 11th, is the last day to register to vote. Not sure if you are registered? Click here to find out.

As each of you is on bedrest growing your little one, give some thought to what type of world you want your little one to grow up in. Is what you are seeing on TV, on the internet, in the newspapers and magazines or what you are hearing around you what you want for your child? Is it what you want for yourself? The choices may not be as enticing as you may like, but you do still have a choice. The next chapter in our country’s history is about to be written. Make sure that you have your say in its content!


Mamas on Bedrest: Black Infant Mortality Awareness Walk!

September 14th, 2016


September is Infant Mortality Awareness month and on Saturday, September 24, 2016, Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond and her supporters will walk from Seton Medical Center in Austin to The Dell Seton Medical School at the University of Texas to raise awareness of Black Infant Mortality. Why are we walking?

The Numbers


From 2000 to 2013, The National Vital Statistics Report shows the infant mortality rate (IMR) declined nationally, yet there remains a persistent 2—3 fold disparity in IMR of black infants compared to their white and hispanic counterparts. Texas follows this trend with an IMR of 5.8 overall in 2013. But looking at specific data from the Texas Department of Health and Human Services for 2013, while the overall IMR was 5.8 deaths per 1000 births, the IMR of black infants statewide was 11.9 deaths per 1000 births. The picture gets even gloomier if we look at Travis County. In 2012 (the last year for which data has been compiled) the IMR for black infants was 13.6 deaths per 1000 births, 2.85 times the death rate of white infants. In 2013, the disparity ratio for IMR of black infants to all infants in Texas was 3.02, or black infants are 3.02 times more likely to die before their first birthday than infants of other races here in Travis County.

Austin/Travis County is the state capital and one of the wealthiest counties in the state. Yet since 2000 Austin/Travis County has failed in its attempts to improve birth outcomes and survival rates for black infants to match those of infants of other races. The IMR for 2013 actually represents an increase in IMR from previous data.

The Call to Action

We believe that an IMR of 6.0 deaths per 1000 or less is attainable for black infants in Travis County, just as it has been attained for infants of other races. Here are 6 steps we could initiate to make this possible:

  • Strongly encourage the Texas Legislature to take the Medicaid Expansion funds allotted for the state by the Affordable Care Act. This alone would insure another 1.3 million Texans, many of them women and infants, and give more access to comprehensive prenatal care, post natal and pediatric care.
  • Work to increase the number of black health care providers (physicians, nurses, midwives, lactation consultants, childbirth educators and community health workers) in Austin/Travis County.
  • Include members of the black community in the conversation about Place Based health initiatives and new treatments (like 17P for the prevention of preterm labor) so that they can make informed decisions about their health care, help educate members of the community and increase utilization.
  • An aggressive community outreach campaign which includes community gatherings for conversations, presentations at churches and other community venues and even door to door health information and health education efforts by members of the community.
  • Educate and elevate. Black citizens in Travis County are not looking for a handout, but a hand up. When information is presented in a clear and understandable way, people are more receptive, more apt to listen and more likely to act.
  • Support initiatives that will help restore the infrastructure in the black community such as improved schools, jobs, affordable housing, safe and affordable childcare, additional security, public transportation and grocery stores.

What are you doing to raise awareness about Black Infant Mortality? Share your thoughts and events in our comments section below.

For more information about our walk or to get involved, e-mail us at



The National Vital Statistics Report, Volume 64, Number 9. August 6, 2015

The Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, Infant Mortality for the State of Texas and Travis County

Mamas on Bedrest: Black Breastfeeding Infographic

August 31st, 2016

Hello Mamas,

As Black Breastfeeding Week wraps up, I am pleased to share with you an infographic that I helped to develop. Hope it helps you have get the vital information you may need to breastfeed!!!Black Breastfeeding Week_Aug 25-31_final