Mamas on Bedrest: Finding Funds While on Bedrest

October 27th, 2015

Mamaonbedrest-on-the-phoneLately I have been bombarded with messages and e-mails from Mamas on Bedrest seeking for financial help. I hear you and I so wish that I could help. Unfortunately, Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond was never designed to provide financial assistance to families in need.

This is not a new issue. Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond has been a staunch advocate of paid family and maternity leave since its inception. We have traveled to the halls of congress with other family leave proponents to petition legislators to pass a paid family leave bill without success. To date, The National Partnership of Women and Families, MomsRising and others continue to press for paid leave, and while we have gotten close, there still remains no uniform, national paid family leave for new parents. Thus the United States has the dubious distinction of being the only industrialized nation on the planet not to offer paid family/maternity leave to its citizens. In terms of countries with medical leave benefits, we rank approximately 168th out of 172 nations that offer medical leave benefits. The only other countries without paid leave policies are Lesotho, Swaziland and Papua New Guinea.  Thus the United States, one of the richest nations on the planet, the nation that spends more for health care than any other nation on the planet continues to have birth outcomes and overall health outcomes that rival those of developing nations without technological resources. It is a sad state indeed.

The Family Medical Leave Act is the best that we have and that has its restrictions. Passed in 1993, FMLA allows an employee to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to care for a family member or for the employee to undergo treatment for illness and continue to have healthcare coverage during this time as an employee benefit. But there are some caveats. First, FMLA does not apply if you work for a small company with less that 50 employees. For companies larger than 50 employees or electing to enact FMLA, if an employee is out beyond the 12 weeks, the employers is not obligated to keep them as employees and many people have lost their jobs due to prolonged illness and absence. Additionally, while employers may be required to keep you on as an employee, they are not required to keep you in your same position or at your same salary. So after your leave, you may return to your place of employment but not to your same position.

Some individual companies have elected to offer their employees paid medical leave. This is a very individual decision and one that is not at all regulated. If your employer offers a paid leave benefit, you need to contact the human resources office to see what the rules and stipulations are regarding the paid leave. You will want to ask if there is a minimum amount of time you have had to be with the company in order to be eligible for the benefit as well as ask if you have to be a full time, salaried/exempt employee.

What else can Mamas on Bedrest do? How is a mama supposed to go on bedrest, rest, relax and calmly gestate her baby when she is filled with anxiety about her family’s finances? There are a few things that mamas can do that may help their financial situations. We offer these suggestions:

  1. Learn the laws and regulations governing paid leave for your state. Three states, California, New Jersey and Rhode Island, offer paid family and medical leave. All three states fund their programs through employee-paid payroll taxes and are administered through their respective disability programs. Other states and counties have various medical leave laws, so visit your state, county and local webpages to see what your area offers in the way of medical leave.
  2. Check with your state’s labor office. Some states have a disability program and take a portion out of your paycheck for this program. If this is the case, you may be eligible to apply for benefits. Often the benefit is a percentage of your pay, say 60%, but isn’t 60% of your salary better than nothing? These programs also have various rules and regulations so check with your state labor office for complete details and to learn how to apply if there is a program for which you are eligible.
  3. Speak with your employer. Some employers are willing to make allowances for your absence. In some cases, if you are able to work from home, they will set you up with equipment to continue working while on bedrest. In other situations you may be able to job-share; a co-worker covers for you now and you cover for them when you are able. Many employers are more amenable to being flexible than losing an employee and having to find and hire a replacement which actually represents a substantial cost to the employer.
  4. Consider Work from Home options. If you aren’t eligible for any sort of paid leave, your state/county doesn’t have a disability program and your employer/job won’t allow for you to work from home, you may want to consider work from home options. Some mamas have started businesses while on bedrest, working as virtual assistants, bookkeepers, medical transcriptionist and other jobs that have nominal equipment requirements and flexible hours. If you aren’t sure what types of work from home opportunities are available, I strongly suggest that you visit This website is run by my friend and colleague Holly Hannah and offers tips and advice for moms who want to find legitimate work from home opportunities.

I realize that adding to the stress of being placed on bedrest and worrying about how you are going to make ends meet you may not feel like looking for a job, but I have to say that many a mama has created a wonderful business out of her bedrest experience. (i.e. Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond, the Bedrest Concierge, The Sleep Whisperer just to name a few! Also, check out our podcasts! There are several mamas there who have taken their pregnancy/bedrest experiences and turned them into satisfying and profitable businesses!). While being placed on bedrest may not seem like an opportunity, it may in fact be the start of something wonderful for you! Check out your options. Look at the resources available to you. Ask those around you if there is something that you can do to pass the time that would help them. You may be surprised at what opportunities come your way!

If you have found a way to stay financially solvent while on bedrest, or if you have started a business while on bedrest, please share your story in our comments section below. You  truly are an inspiration and other mamas will greatly benefit from your wisdom and savvy!!!

Mamas on Bedrest: How Does Breastfeeding Help Prevent Breast Cancer-REALLY??

October 14th, 2015

nursing infantHello Mamas!!

I am sure that we are all well aware by now of the benefits of breastfeeding for infants. Human breastmilk is the perfect food for infants because,

  • It has the proper amount of nutrients and adapts to the nutrition needs of the infantIt is easily digested,
  • It requires no preparation or special storage,
  • It is is always the right temperature (when directly from the breast).
  • Babies that are breastfed are less likely to have ear infections
  • Breastfed babies are less likely to have allergies and asthma and if they do have allergies and asthma the conditions tend to be less severe
  • Breastfed babies have a reduced incidence of developing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  • Breastfed children have a lower incidence of obesity

With all of these great benefits for children, you’d think that we here in the US would be jumping through all sorts of hoops to make sure that ALL mamas breastfeed their babies. There has been a lot of information distributed and I think that more mamas are breastfeeding their infants-at least for the first few months of life. However, data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states,

“In 2011, 79% of newborn infants started to breastfeed. Yet breastfeeding did not continue for as long as recommended. Of infants born in 2011, 49% were breastfeeding at 6 months and 27% at 12 months.”

So while we are seeing improvement, we still have a ways to go to reach the Healthy People 2020 goal of approximately 82% of infants being exclusively breastfed at birth. Yet, would these numbers change if mamas knew the benefits of breastfeeding on their health, in particular on their risks of developing breast cancer?

Rachel King, a health education specialist in MD Anderson’s Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center reports:

“Research shows mothers who breastfeed lower their risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer. And, breastfeeding longer than the recommended six months can provide additional protection.”

Most women who breastfeed experience hormonal changes during lactation that delay their menstrual periods. This reduces a woman’s lifetime exposure to estrogen, which can promote breast cancer cell growth. In addition, during pregnancy and breastfeeding, you shed breast tissue. “This shedding can help remove cells with potential DNA damage, thus helping to reduce your chances of developing breast cancer,” King adds.

Breastfeeding also can help lower your ovarian cancer risk by preventing ovulation. And the less you ovulate, the less exposure to estrogen and abnormal ovarian cells that could become cancer.

So EXACTLY how can mamas lower their breast (and ovarian) cancer risks by breastfeeding?

  1. Have their babies before age 30
  2. Breastfeed for at least 6 months
  3. Get education and support from a lactation consultant
  4. Take Breastfeeding classes
  5. Get the support of family, friends and employers
  6. Ask employers for quiet, private places to pump

Breastfeeding is not chic nor a trend. Breastfeeding is the natural way that human babies were intended to be fed. Now we know that breastfeeding is beneficial not only to babies but also protective against breast cancer for mamas. What other incentives do we need? Let’s do this, Mamas!

October is Breast cancer awareness month. Mamas, If you have questions about breast cancer, have a family history of breast cancer or want to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer, start by breastfeeding your infant for at least 6 months. For more information, speak with your health care provider, consult with a lactation consultant and check out the information below (This is just a sample of what is available and what was cited in this post. For sure there is more information available!!). As always, you can post your questions and comments below for a ready reply!


MD Anderson Center

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-US Breastfeeding Report Card 2014



Mamas on Bedrest: To end the bedrest debate, we need more healthy mamas!

September 22nd, 2015

Greetings Mamas!!

The bedrest debate continues as more and more studies are advocating treatment of the causes of bedrest in lieu of activity restriction. However, there are those that are convinced that bedrest is an effective treatment for preterm labor and prolongs pregnancy. Let’s take a look at the evidence.

For over 25 years, Judith Maloni, RN, PhD researched bedrest and found that the practice has no apparent benefit and has been shown to be harmful to pregnant women. Her publication, “AntepartumBed Rest for Pregnancy Complications: Efficacy and Safety for Preventing Preterm Birth”(1), Maloni denounced the bedrest prescription because there was no evidence to support the practice.

In 2007. NASA released an article which showed that female astronauts in space lost bone mass and muscle mass and strength in as little as 2 weeks of inactivity, and the effects were even more pronounced at 60 days.(2) They recommended that if women do have to be on limited activity for an extended period of time, they should engage in a modified exercise program to maintain bone and muscle integrity.

The World Health Organization and Amnesty International have both denounced the bed rest prescription and have had sharp criticism of the United States-which boasts the highest costs of maternity care than any other country in the world, yet has some of the highest rates of complications, bed rest, interventions, cesarean sections and maternal and infant morbidity and mortality-to rethink their maternity care practices and to bring their maternity statistics in line with the rest of the world.

In 2013, physicians in the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists began questioning the practice of prescribed bedrest and Christina McCall, MD (3) and Joseph Biggio, Jr., MD (4) both called on their ACOG colleagues to stop the practice of bedrest citing the harm that is poses to pregnant women.

However, bedrest remains a mainstay in obstetrical practice. Here in Austin, the 2 major hospital systems each have large antepartum units which cater to women experiencing pregnancy complications. My colleague Angela Davids, founder of, recently blogged about an article by Drs. Christine Piette Durrance and Melanie Guldi (5) in which the authors concluded after an extensive review of PRAMS (Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System) data of some 200,000 women, that limited inactivity does reduce preterm birth before 33 weeks by 7.7% and low birth weight infants (weighing less that 1500 grams) by 15.4%.

So what are mamas to think? Should they abandon bedrest? Remain on bedrest? Is there a way to not have to go on bedrest, to not encounter the complications that lead to the bedrest prescription?

At this juncture if you are a mama on bedrest, I WOULD NOT recommend abandoning the care plan that your provider has put into place for you. If you have questions about whether or not bedrest is necessary in your case, speak with your provider and voice your concerns. I am a firm believer that if you have hired (chosen) a provider for services, then you should follow their directions. Now if you are having reservations about being on bed rest, its efficacy and whether or not it is doing harm to you, you must have a candid conversation with your OB and get your questions answered so that you can make an informed decision.

I myself am a proponent of mamas getting off bedrest. I believe the way to do it is to help women to be in the best shape BEFORE they ever think about getting pregnant so that when they are pregnant they are strong and healthy. Many of you reading this may be saying, “Well fat lot of good that does me now!” I sense your frustration. There is nothing we mamas on bedrest do better than second guess ourselves! But what you did in the past (no matter how recent) is of no consequence. As Dr. Maya Angelou eloquently said, “When you know better, you do better.” You know better right now, so begin taking exquisite care of yourself right now! As much as possible,

  • Eat healthy, nutrient dense foods.
  • Drink lots of water (1/2 your current body weight but in ounces).
  • Rest (I know that sounds ridiculous, but many mamas on bedrest are so stressed out they don’t sleep well and don’t rest. Your body is not only maintaining you, it is also growing another fully complete human being. That most certainly deserves a nap!
  • Do stretches t keep your muscles supple and limber. (BedrestFitness!)
  • Keep your spirits up

I don’t know what is to become of bedrest and the bedrest prescription. I do know for the nearly 1 million women who will experience bedrest, you have to take care of yourself. If you are in the Austin, TX area, look me up! I always enjoy mixing with mamas and would be happy to serve you.

How are you surviving bedrest? Share your tips and comments section below.



Judith Maloni, Ph.D.  AntepartumBed Rest for Pregnancy Complications: Efficacy and Safety for Preventing Preterm Birth (Biological Research for Nursing 12(2) 106-124)

Mark Ransford. NASA-Funded Study finds Exercise Could Help Women on Bedrest November 15, 2007

Christina McCall, MD, “Therapeutic” Bed Rest in Pregnancy, Unethical and Unsupported by Data”, vol 121, No.6 June 2013, 1305-1308

Joseph Biggio, Jr., MD.“Bed Rest in Pregnancy, Time to Put the Issue to Rest!” vol 121 No. 6, June 2013, 1158-1160

Christine Piette Durrance and Melanie Guldi. Maternal Bedrest and Infant Health.