Mamas on Bedrest: Heart Health During and After Bedrest

August 18th, 2014

Greetings Mamas!!

We all know that Bedrest is difficult, but did you know that certain complications that cause  mamas to be put on bed  rest can also put mamas at risk for heart health problems later in life?

In today’s post, I am sharing with you an info graphic from the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC) which outlines the potential cardiovascular (heart) risks that Mamas on Bedrest are exposed to as a result of certain pregnancy complications. The purpose of sharing this info graphic is not to scare you, depress you about being on bed rest or to add more stress to an already difficult situation. Rather, my motive is to make you aware of future health risks, to educate you and share information with you so that you can take the best care of yourselves now, during your pregnancies, and throughout the rest of your lives.

The CMQCC infographic specifically names Pregnancy Induced Hypertension, Pre-Eclampsia, HELLP Syndrome, Gestational Diabetes and Preterm Births all as increasing a mama’s risk of developing heart disease later in life. We know this because of information shared in previous blog posts on Peripartum Cardiomyopathy, Pre-Eclampsia, and Gestational Diabetes.

But I really like this infographic because it gives a lot of information in a neat, concise and readable fashion. I think the infographic is easy to follow and mamas can get all the information that they need at a glance. Then if mamas desire more information, they can read the additional resources provided in this post and in the resources in the infographic at their leisure.

This is great information, Mamas. Do take the time to read it. Got Questions? Ask them on our live Free Q & A teleseminar this Thursday! I, Bedrest Coach Darline Turner, will be answering all bed rest related questions, including those related to this infographic. While I can’t offer specific medical advice, I can steer you in the right directions to get all the information you need to make wise health care choices!

 

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Mamas on Bedrest: : How to Cope When Life Throws Unexpected Curves?

August 11th, 2014

Hello Mamas!

How do you cope when life throws you unexpected curves? This summer had one giant unexpected curve and I have been chasing my tail ever since! I had planned to drive to Boston from Austin with my kids, stopping to visit and stay with friends and family along the way. I had planned for a fun-filled month in Boston before leisurely driving to North Carolina for my family reunion and then dropping my kids off with their father for their summer visit. But just 2 days after I arrived in Boston, I received a call that my mother in law passed away. We rushed back to my mother in laws funeral, driving a frantic 981 miles in 2 days. I spent a weekend with my ex-inlaws (need I say more) and from that point on, my leisurely schedule was completely blown out of the water. And while I did accomplish most of what I had planned to do this summer, I feel completed wiped out and in need of  a “vacation from my vacation.”

I thought of you all often. Bedrest is a similar curve thrown into the middle of your pregnancy, obliterating all your pregnancy plans. So how do you cope when life throws  you such an unexpected curve?

I found for myself, focusing on the essentials was key. This  is a similar sentiment shared by not only many of the Mamas on Bedrest in our book, “From Mamas to Mamas: The Essential Guide to Surviving Bedrest”, but it was also echoed by the dads. As one dad put it,

“I had to focus on what was really important and then let everything else go.”

He is so right! This summer, after my plans and timing went askew, I had to focus on doing what needed to be done. For me, that meant keeping things steady and fun for my kids (this was the first death of a close relative that they had ever experienced) and keeping my own spirits up and taking really good care of myself so that I can take care of those around me. But what are the essential things Mamas on Bedrest need to focus on during this time of upheavel?

1. Take exquisite care of yourself!  Most Mamas on Bedrest want to focus on their babies, but Mamas,  the best thing you can do for your baby is to be in the best possible health yourself. Be very vigilant with your diet feeding your body nutrient dense foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, leans cuts of protein and lots of water. The more nutrients your body has to work with the more it will be able to be in service to you and your baby! Nature has designed it that your baby will get what it needs from your body to grow and develop. Let’s be sure that your body has enough nutrient supply so that the baby can have what he/she needs without depleting your body and leaving you at risk for illness, injury or disease. Also get plenty of good restorative sleep and check in with your doctor to see  what are safe ways to move your body while on bed rest.

2. Make sure the essential needs of your family are met. If you have other children at home, you and your partner will need to make sure that their routines remain as regular as possible, and that they have plenty of love and support from both of you as well as from friends and family. The honest truth is that you and your partner will be stressed and stretched during this time. If friends and family are available to help out, take them up on their offers for childcare and household help. These “gifts” are invaluable.

3. Make sure you and your partner stay connected. This is a frantic time for Dads. They have to stand by while the women they love do some serious work to bring their babies into this world. For men to not be able to “fix it” can be truly frustrating as well as humbling. Also, Dads are feeling the stress of the pregnancy as much as moms-albeit in a very different way. Make sure to stay connected during this time. Take time to be together, to talk, share and yes, cuddle. Sex is usually prohibited during bedrest, but hugging, kissing and cuddling are not and those intimacies can make a world of difference for Mamas, Dads and babies!!!

4. Release Obligation. Bedrest has a hidden blessing: You are no longer held to the myriad of obligations you are committed to. To that end, take a bit of time while on bed rest to really ask yourself, “Do I really need to do all those work and community activities? Which ones really fill you and which ones are “Shoulds”? Which activities should you not only suspend due to bed rest, but indefinitely? Take this time to sort these out.

5. Stay positive an have fun. Bedrest is hard and most women will tell you that the mental/emotional battles were the worst! If you can stay positive and focus on the joy of your baby, you will do well navigating Bedrest. It’s not easy. Difficult tests and complications will sometimes bring you down. But if you can surround yourself with friends, family and things you love, you will make it though.

 

Have these tips helped you? Find these and more in our book, “From Mamas to Mamas, The Essential Guide to Surviving Bedrest” available for immediate download now on Amazon.com

Have a particular question you’d like to ask and have answered?  Join us for our Free Third Thursday Teleseminar on August 21, 2014 from Noon – 1pm ET. Bedrest Coach Darline Turner will be ansering questions live from callers as well as answering questions submitted via e-mail. Register for the Free seminar to receive call in information. If you prefer to submit your question anonymously, send an e-mail to Info@mamasonbedrest.com by 5pm ET on Wednesday, August 20,2014.

Need support? Join our Facebook community and interact with hundreds of mamas who are or have been right where you are now!

Mamas on Bedrest: It’s National Breastfeeding Awareness Month

August 4th, 2014

nursing infantGreetings Mamas!!

August kicks off National Breastfeeding Awareness Month here in the US. Officially designated on August 6, 2011 by the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC), the month of educational and promotional activities is designed to raise awareness of the benefits of breastfeeding-physiologically for mamas, developmentally for babies, emotionally for both and economically for families.  Here is the full proclamation. Breastfeeding has been reported to have the following benefits. In Babies

  • Breast milk is widely acknowledged as the most complete form of nutrition for infants, with a range of benefits for infants’ health, growth, immunity and development. (Healthy People 2010, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia)
  • Breast-fed children are more resistant to disease and infection early in life than formula-fed children. Many studies show that breastfeeding strengthens the immune system. During nursing, the mother passes antibodies to the child, which help the child resist diseases and help improve the normal immune response to certain vaccines. Breast-fed children are less likely to contract a number of diseases later in life, including juvenile diabetes, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, and cancer before the age of 15
  • Breastfed babies are less likely to be obese as adults
  • Breastfeeding has been shown to reduce the likelihood of ear infections, and to prevent recurrent ear infections. Ear infections are a major reason that infants take multiple courses of antibiotics.
  • Researchers have observed a decrease in the probability of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in breast-fed infants.
  • Another apparent benefit from breastfeeding may be protection from allergies. Eczema, an allergic reaction, is significantly rarer in breast-fed babies. A review of 132 studies on allergy and breastfeeding concluded that breastfeeding appears to help protect children from developing allergies, and that the effect seems to be particularly strong among children whose parents have allergies.

In Mamas

  • Breastfeeding helps a woman to lose weight after birth.
  • Breastfeeding releases a hormone in the mother (oxytocin) that causes the uterus to return to its normal size more quickly.
  • When a woman gives birth and proceeds to nurse her baby, she protects herself from becoming pregnant again too soon, a form of birth control found to be 98 percent effective — more effective than a diaphragm or condom. Scientists believe this process prevents more births worldwide than all forms of contraception combined. In Africa, breastfeeding prevents an estimated average of four births per woman, and in Bangladesh it prevents an estimated average of 6.5 births per woman.
  • Breastfeeding appears to reduce the mother’s risk of developing osteoporosis in later years. Although mothers experience bone-mineral loss during breastfeeding, their mineral density is replenished and even increased after lactation.
  • Diabetic women improve their health by breastfeeding. Not only do nursing infants have increased protection from juvenile diabetes, the amount of insulin that the mother requires postpartum goes down.
  • Women who lactate for a total of two or more years reduce their chances of developing breast cancer by 24 percent.
  • Women who breastfeed their children have been shown to be less likely to develop uterine, endometrial or ovarian cancer.
  • The emotional health of the mother may be enhanced by the relationship she develops with her infant during breastfeeding, resulting in fewer feelings of anxiety and a stronger sense of connection with her baby. Breastfeeding has also been shown to reduce the incidence of post partum depression in mamas. (See our posts on Breastfeeding and Post Partum Depression!)

August 1-7, 2014 is also World Breastfeeding Week. Coordinated by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA), the theme for this year’s week of awareness is to impress upon everyone importance of increasing and sustaining the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is one of the methods advocated in the Millennium Development Goals, developed in 1990 by the United Nations and affiliated governments to help fight poverty and promote healthy and sustainable development in a comprehensive way by 2015.

wbw2014-objectives According to the WABA breastfeeding and the Millennium Develoment Goals are intricately linked, “The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are meant to be achieved by 2015 – next year! Although much progress has taken place, there is still a lot of “unfinished business”. Here are some examples: Poverty has gone down, but 1 in 8 people still go to bed hungry. Undernutrition affects about a quarter of all children globally. Overweight, the other form of malnutrition is becoming more common too. In the last 2 decades, child mortality has decreased by about 40%, but still almost 7 million children under five die each year, mainly from preventable diseases. As the overall rate of under-five mortality has declined, the proportion of neonatal deaths (during the first month of life) comprises an increasing proportion of all child deaths. Globally, maternal mortality has declined from 400 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 in 2010, but fewer than half of women deliver in baby-friendly maternities. By protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding, YOU can contribute to each of the MDGs in a substantial way. Exclusive breastfeeding and adequate complementary feeding are key interventions for improving child survival, potentially saving about 20% of children under five. Let’s review how the UN’s Scientific Committee on Nutrition illustrated how breastfeeding is linked to each of the Millennium Development Goals.” So breastfeeding can go a long way to not only benefitting the health of mamas and babies individually, but help reduce poverty, malnutrition and infant and child mortality globally. If you are considering breastfeeding and want more information, the links in this post are from some of the best resources globally, especially if you want to take on an advocacy role. If you want more specific personal information on breastfeeding, I suggest you contact your local La Leche League. These folks really know breastfeeding!! They offer a plethora of information on their website, have many books on breastfeeding available for purchase and do phone and often in person consultations. You can also check with your healthcare provider and local hospital for referrals to lactation consultants who can assist with breastfeeding.   Do you have more questions? Join Bedrest Coach Darline Turner for a one hour Q & A session during the Free Third Thursday Teleseminar, August 21, 2014, 1:00-2:00pm ET. She will field any and all questions relating to bedrest, pregnancy and post partum. You can join the conversation live or submit your questions up to 24 hours before via e-mail at info@mamasonbedrest.com. Join our interactive bed rest community on Facebook and chat with mamas globally on all things bed rest! Finally, Get your copy of the e-book From Mamas: The Essential Guide to Surviving Bedrest! This guide will help you not only survive bedrest, but THRIVE on bedrest! Order your copy now on Amazon.com   Other Resources: Natural Resources Defense Council 101 Reasons to Breastfeed Your Child