Prenatal Health Maintenance

Mamasonbedrest: Healthy Happy Pregnancy Cookbook

February 14th, 2017

In this video blog, Darline Turner shares the Healthy Happy Pregnancy Cookbook. Written by Registered Dieticians Stephanie Clarke and Willow Jarosh, the book contains 125 recipes that are not only tasty, but also address many of the common ailments of pregnancy. Today, Darline tries the Blueberry Banana Oat smoothie, designed to give pregnant mamas, most especially mamas on bedrest relief from leg cramps.

Mamas on Bedrest: To end the bedrest debate, we need more healthy mamas!

September 22nd, 2015

Greetings Mamas!!

The bedrest debate continues as more and more studies are advocating treatment of the causes of bedrest in lieu of activity restriction. However, there are those that are convinced that bedrest is an effective treatment for preterm labor and prolongs pregnancy. Let’s take a look at the evidence.

For over 25 years, Judith Maloni, RN, PhD researched bedrest and found that the practice has no apparent benefit and has been shown to be harmful to pregnant women. Her publication, “AntepartumBed Rest for Pregnancy Complications: Efficacy and Safety for Preventing Preterm Birth”(1), Maloni denounced the bedrest prescription because there was no evidence to support the practice.

In 2007. NASA released an article which showed that female astronauts in space lost bone mass and muscle mass and strength in as little as 2 weeks of inactivity, and the effects were even more pronounced at 60 days.(2) They recommended that if women do have to be on limited activity for an extended period of time, they should engage in a modified exercise program to maintain bone and muscle integrity.

The World Health Organization and Amnesty International have both denounced the bed rest prescription and have had sharp criticism of the United States-which boasts the highest costs of maternity care than any other country in the world, yet has some of the highest rates of complications, bed rest, interventions, cesarean sections and maternal and infant morbidity and mortality-to rethink their maternity care practices and to bring their maternity statistics in line with the rest of the world.

In 2013, physicians in the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists began questioning the practice of prescribed bedrest and Christina McCall, MD (3) and Joseph Biggio, Jr., MD (4) both called on their ACOG colleagues to stop the practice of bedrest citing the harm that is poses to pregnant women.

However, bedrest remains a mainstay in obstetrical practice. Here in Austin, the 2 major hospital systems each have large antepartum units which cater to women experiencing pregnancy complications. My colleague Angela Davids, founder of Keepemcookin.com, recently blogged about an article by Drs. Christine Piette Durrance and Melanie Guldi (5) in which the authors concluded after an extensive review of PRAMS (Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System) data of some 200,000 women, that limited inactivity does reduce preterm birth before 33 weeks by 7.7% and low birth weight infants (weighing less that 1500 grams) by 15.4%.

So what are mamas to think? Should they abandon bedrest? Remain on bedrest? Is there a way to not have to go on bedrest, to not encounter the complications that lead to the bedrest prescription?

At this juncture if you are a mama on bedrest, I WOULD NOT recommend abandoning the care plan that your provider has put into place for you. If you have questions about whether or not bedrest is necessary in your case, speak with your provider and voice your concerns. I am a firm believer that if you have hired (chosen) a provider for services, then you should follow their directions. Now if you are having reservations about being on bed rest, its efficacy and whether or not it is doing harm to you, you must have a candid conversation with your OB and get your questions answered so that you can make an informed decision.

I myself am a proponent of mamas getting off bedrest. I believe the way to do it is to help women to be in the best shape BEFORE they ever think about getting pregnant so that when they are pregnant they are strong and healthy. Many of you reading this may be saying, “Well fat lot of good that does me now!” I sense your frustration. There is nothing we mamas on bedrest do better than second guess ourselves! But what you did in the past (no matter how recent) is of no consequence. As Dr. Maya Angelou eloquently said, “When you know better, you do better.” You know better right now, so begin taking exquisite care of yourself right now! As much as possible,

  • Eat healthy, nutrient dense foods.
  • Drink lots of water (1/2 your current body weight but in ounces).
  • Rest (I know that sounds ridiculous, but many mamas on bedrest are so stressed out they don’t sleep well and don’t rest. Your body is not only maintaining you, it is also growing another fully complete human being. That most certainly deserves a nap!
  • Do stretches t keep your muscles supple and limber. (BedrestFitness!)
  • Keep your spirits up

I don’t know what is to become of bedrest and the bedrest prescription. I do know for the nearly 1 million women who will experience bedrest, you have to take care of yourself. If you are in the Austin, TX area, look me up! I always enjoy mixing with mamas and would be happy to serve you.

How are you surviving bedrest? Share your tips and comments section below.

 

References

Judith Maloni, Ph.D.  AntepartumBed Rest for Pregnancy Complications: Efficacy and Safety for Preventing Preterm Birth (Biological Research for Nursing 12(2) 106-124)

Mark Ransford. NASA-Funded Study finds Exercise Could Help Women on Bedrest November 15, 2007

Christina McCall, MD, “Therapeutic” Bed Rest in Pregnancy, Unethical and Unsupported by Data”, vol 121, No.6 June 2013, 1305-1308

Joseph Biggio, Jr., MD.“Bed Rest in Pregnancy, Time to Put the Issue to Rest!” vol 121 No. 6, June 2013, 1158-1160

Christine Piette Durrance and Melanie Guldi. Maternal Bedrest and Infant Health.

Mamas on Bedrest: Texas earned a “C”. What’s your state’s premature birth grade?

November 18th, 2014

World Prematurity DayHello Mamas,

November 17th is World Prematurity Awareness Day. All over the globe there will be educational events, initiatives, presentations and activities all designed to raise awareness about the very serious problem of prematurity. Premature birth is the leading cause of neonatal death in infants under one year old and each year, 15 million babies die as a result of being born too soon-and are too young and too sick to survive.

Now we are all likely sitting here and thinking, that’s a shame. Those poor babies in developing countries have such a tough road to hoe. Well fasten your seat belts! Despite spending more than most other countries on the planet for health care, The United States has one of the worst rate of premature births of the developed nations. Each year nearly 500,000 infants are born too soon in the US-that’s 1 out of 9 infants!! These numbers are sobering. What’s more, where you are born has a lot to do with your chances of being born prematurely.

Taking a look at the US as a whole, there has been a reduction in the overall rates of preterm labor and premature births. As of this month, the March of Dimes reports rates of premature births (2013 data) has fallen for the 7th straight year to 11.4% and as such, the nation has reached its goal (9.6%) set for Healthy People 2020 7 years early. But when we look at individual states, there is a much different picture. While some states are doing well reducing the number of premature infants born, others are not faring so well. Texas, where I live, currently has a grade of “C”, while my home state of Massachusetts is graded a “B” and only Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Oregon and California earned “A” Grades. Sadly, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Puerto Rico earned “F’s”.

The March of Dimes is working aggressively with state, national and international health representatives to determine what factors are the major reasons babies are born prematurely, and what interventions can be put in place to ameliorate them so that babies won’t be born too soon. The solutions are really pretty simple. It’s not more technology. It’s not more complicated political laws. It’s education. Women need to know that as soon as they become pregnant, they must begin prenatal care. It’s access. Women globally need access to comprehensive, affordable prenatal care. In developing nations as well as in many areas of the United States, women don’t have easy access to health care services. If the nearest health care center is 3 hours away by car and they don’t have a care and no access to any sort of public transportation, they won’t get regular prenatal care! It’s resources. In many rural or economically depressed areas, women simply don’t have the money for food, shelter and prenatal care.  Health care resources may be limited. Access to the midwifery model of care; Attendant care with midwives and doulas which have been shown to reduce the rates of complications and poor birth outcomes, makes these women vulnerable to poor birth outcomes. Breastfeeding Education. Many women still are uneducated about the benefits of breastfeeding, don’t receive breastfeeding education/suppport and don’t have access to pumps.

So how does your state rate? What’s its grade? How is your prenatal care? Let us know in the comments section below. If you need assistance or information, feel free to include that in your comment or write privately to info@mamasobedrest.com