Work Life Balance

Mamas on Bedrest: Raise your child and your business!

May 28th, 2014

Happy Wednesday, Mamas!!

In this video blog, I am pleased to share with you a new program being offered by my business coach, Diane Carroll, owner and founder of Maverick Center. Diane is passionate about creating work that you love and that serves you, your family, the world and brings in an abundant income. Diane is offering a coaching program to mothers who want to work from home in order to raise their children. With first hand experience in this work format-As well as with the Maverick Center-I wholeheartedly recommend this program if it speaks to you.

Mamas on Bedrest: From Bump to Birth-10 Tips for Maternity Leave

December 6th, 2013

Family on ComputerI am totally dismayed by the fact that the United States is the only industrialized nation and one of only 3 nations globally that don’t offer any sort of mandatory paid maternity/paternity leave. I believe that it is a HUGE detriment to our workforce, especially now since approximately 51% of the workforce is women. Because of US employment policies, many women are forced to choose between career and family, i.e “career track” and “mommy track”. Likewise, many men miss out on the joys of family and parenting as they work diligently to support their families if and/or when their wives become pregnant and are home caring for the children. Families should be allowed more flexibility and balance, and unfortunately this just isn’t the case.

As many Mamas on Bedrest know, unexpected complications during pregnancy can further throw off family financial balance. If a woman is the principle wage earner and has to be out of work for weeks to months due to bed rest, the impact to the family’s financial security can be devastating. The family will not only be impacted financially on the day to day level, but may also be at risk of losing precious health care benefits at a time when they are needed most. Today, Eric Adamowsky, co-founder of CreditCardInsider.com shares with us 10 Tips for Maternity Leave. They surveyed working mamas and asked them what they thought the most important tips are to note regarding maternity leave. This is what Mamas shared with them, and they graciously shared this information with us. Thanks so much Eric! Mamas, take note. There is some really good info here!!

 

While our biggest focus at Credit Card Insider is providing information about the responsible use of credit and credit cards, we’re always looking for ways to help people manage their finances in all areas of life, and especially at different major life stages. For this post, we asked for maternity leave advice from experienced moms in the workforce and discovered ten key themes.

1. Communicate with your employer
2. Be professional
3. Prepare – physically, emotionally, financially
4. Pre-plan a few meals
5. Cherish and maximize your time with baby
6. Give yourself a break
7. Accept help
8. Learn to be the baby’s mom
9. Include dad in the plan
10. Pace your transition back to work

If you notice overlap in the themes, such as a consistent message to take as much time off as you can, pay attention.

Communicate with your employer

No one will plan your maternity leave for you. It’s up to you to research any benefits and how to get them. Don’t be afraid to take full advantage of any maternity leave benefits available to you. If your maternity leave is unpaid, you could be eligible for paid family leave benefits from the state. Call your state’s unemployment/disability office for more information.

Prepare – physically, emotionally, and financially

Realize that everything is about to change – your body, your feelings, your schedule, your budget. Plan as well as you can. Be kind to your body. Producing a little human is no small job. Play with the idea that you might want to take an extended absence from work. Your career will always be there, but your child wants and needs your time and attention now. So think now – before the baby comes – about money. Don’t chant the “everything will work out” mantra. To get what you want, a solid financial plan will be a thousand times more effective than a wish and a prayer.

Pre-plan a few meals

You’ll hear from practically every new parent that once the baby is born, your day will revolve around meeting baby’s needs and not much else. You’ll be tired, possibly overwhelmed, and very short on time to handle previously mundane tasks like shopping and cooking. The most organized new parents think ahead to prepare meals (or at least key ingredients, like meat) that can later be heated, requiring no preparation whatsoever.

Cherish and maximize your time with baby

Studies show that most new moms don’t want to return to full time work after the birth of a baby. Even if you love your job or you don’t think you can live without the income, consider the possibility that you’ll fall into that category and plan for it as well as you can. Maximize your time off. Once you go back to work, find out if you can work from home or ease back part-time. While you’re off, enjoy the time with your new child.

Give yourself a break

Don’t expect to be a “natural” or to take it all in stride, no matter how much experience you have with other peoples’ children. It’s easy to become overwhelmed, and when it’s just mom, dad and baby, the answers don’t always present themselves clearly. In days gone by, extended families lived together and there were older generations around to teach new moms what to do. These days, you might not have that advantage. So cut yourself some slack for any doubts, lack of confidence or unrealistic expectations you may have.

Accept help

When friends and family offer to help, let them. It may seem like a big imposition to ask your mother-in-law or surfing buddy to do your shopping, but if the offer is made, accept it gratefully. Running errands, cooking meals, cleaning the house, and walking a fussy baby are all great tasks to assign to caring people in your inner circle during the first few weeks of your little one’s life. Outside the home, get connected with a lactation support group nearby so that you’ll know where to go if any challenges arise.

Learn to be the baby’s mom

You might slip into your new role with ease… and you might not. Give yourself time to get used to the new routine. Relax and stay in the moment.

Include dad in the plan

You’re in this together. Encourage dad to be an active participant and to bond with baby. Like mom, dad should be unafraid to take the maximum amount of family leave available. Some men feel awkward around the baby, not knowing what to do or how they can help. Comfort will only come with practice. Also, men tend to feel much less free to take extended absences from work, and far more pressure to put the hours in. Each new dad has to set his own priorities, but more and more men are choosing to put family at the top of the list

Pace your transition back to work

Whether you must return to work or just want to, pace the transition. Spend the first two weeks in the daycare setting with your baby, to show that it is a safe, comfortable place that the baby can still associate with mom.  If possible, go back to work part-time and ease into your full-time schedule over time.

And don’t underestimate the amount of time you’ll want to take off!

 

Thanks so much to Eric Adamowsky, Co-founder of CreditCardInsider.com for this post. Mamas, what has worked for you financially balancing bed rest/maternity leave and finances? Please share your tips in the comments section below.

 

Mamas on Bedrest: NASA will pay $18,000 To Watch You Rest in Bed!

September 30th, 2013

220px-NASA_logo.svg_NASA is currently looking for volunteers to lie in bed for 70 days. That’s right, you could get paid a total of around $18,000 for lying in bed, playing games on your phone, reading books, skyping with your friends and family, taking online classes – and even go on with your day job if you can get away with working remotely, so long as you don’t get out of bed for that entire duration.

This is the headline posted In the September 18, 2013 ForbesWoman online magazine. I almost fell out when I saw the headline. Heck, We could bankrupt the government if I sent all of you over there as participants! So I investigated and got the skinny on the study.

According to the article and Dr. Roni Cromwell, Senior Scientist on the study, the purpose of the study is to research the effects of microgravity (living in space) on the human body.  The study simulates the effects of long-duration spaceflight by having test subjects lie in beds for the 70 day period. The beds are tilted head-down at a six-degree angle. According to Dr Cromwell, “this tilt which causes body fluids to shift to the upper part of the body, sets off cardiovascular events that are similar to what we see in a space flight. And by putting someone in bed for a long time, there is also atrophy of the muscle and atrophy of bone density,” she said. The ultimate goal is to see how best to protect and maintain the health of astronauts while they are in space. Additionally, NASA scientists want to see if they can minimize the negative effects of space travel and then help astronauts return to “life on earth” as quickly and effortlessly as possible.

I find this amazing! There is an actual study looking at the “negative effects” of bed rest and measures to counteract it! Have any of you been offered such counter protective measures? And I know that many of you are on bed rest longer than 70 days! Has anyone been offered any sort of Stipend for their  oh, 20 weeks or so of bedrest??? This is absolutely amazing to me that NASA is going to such lengths to protect the health of their astronauts Wow!! All I can say is Wow!

Interestingly, the subjects NASA is looking for must be very healthy and must go through rigorous screening to make sure that they can endure 70 days of bed rest. Were any of you ladies screened??

According to NASA, “We want to make sure we select people who are mentally ready to spend 70 days in bed. Not everyone is comfortable with that. Not every type of person can tolerate an extended time in bed,” says Dr Cromwell.

No Kidding! Really??

“Once they qualify physically and mentally, we do rigorous physical exercises to test muscle strength and aerobics capacity. We want people who have the physical and psychological characteristics of an astronaut. They should be able to do the kind of activities that astronauts do.”

 But can astronauts do the “rigorous activities that mamas do? Can that program prepare astronauts and other civilians to be ready for the demands of motherhood after a mere 70 days of bed rest?  Hmmmm……

And to make sure that folks stay in bed, the test subjects will be showered and use specially designed facilities. 

Well I am simply floored! While I am excited to see how NASA is training and studying the effects of weightless on astronauts, I am appalled that very little work has been done for pregnant women. Bed rest is prescribed for some 750,000 pregnant American women annually. They are given no pre-treatment, no pre-screening and most certainly no $18,000!  In a country with no paid leave, this would mean the difference between mamas being able to actually rest and calmly gestate their babies and potentially losing their jobs, homes and financial security.

NASA has long looked at the effects of bed rest on the body and reached the conclusion that it is not good for any body to be on prolonged inactivity. Judith Maloni, PhD spent her career studying bed rest and how to improve ways to treat high risk pregnant women as bed rest has been shown to have numerous negative side effects on women’s bodies. And yet, NASA gets funded to evaluate weightless on astronauts over a 15 week period. Women who are out on pregnancy bed rest longer than 12 weeks typically do so without pay and risk losing their jobs.

I am hopeful that once NASA completes its study, it will share the results and the medical community, particularly the obstetrical community. I hope OB’s will take heed and make changes in how pregnant women on bed rest are managed. Let’s pay more attention to bone and muscle loss and try to offset it. Let’ s protect mamas’ hearts by taking into consideration the cardiovascular changes that occur with prolonged bed rest and make appropriate evaluations and precautions. And by all means, if it’s all in the name of science, let’s compensate mamas for their efforts! Seems to me that we ought to do something for those propagating our species right here on old planet earth rather than looking for other species on Mars. Just sayin’…..