pregnancy

Mamas on Bedrest: Vermont is the Best State in Which to Have Your Baby!

February 28th, 2017

According to WalletHub.com “2016 Best and Worst Places to Have a Baby”. Wallethub.com is a virtual financial planning company that helps individuals track their spending and saving, help repair credit and help individuals protect their credit history including protecting identity. Wallethub.com tracks people and money and in their opinion, if you cannot afford to have a baby, you shouldn’t. When the parameters of delivery budget (cost to have a baby, cost of living and cost/availability of health insurance), overall health care ranking (maternal and infant mortality, rates of prematurity, availability of professionals such as midwives and pediatricians, etc.. ) and baby friendliness (i.e. parental leave, available childcare, support for new moms, etc..) were analyzed for the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Vermont ranked number 1 as best place to have a baby by wallethub.com.

It is important to plan for children as unintended pregnancies can cause huge financial strains on families and can have serious health implications for mothers and infants if pregnancies occur too close together. But there are other, equally important issues to consider before becoming pregnant; availability of and access to quality prenatal care, adequate food resources, housing, how will the mama/family fare without mama’s income, childcare and availability and accessibility of resources such as transportation that may pose potential roadblocks to a healthy pregnancy and birth.

The article in question alluded to the fact that if a couple cannot afford a child, they should not have a child. Well, I live in Texas where availability of and access to family planning information and resources is extremely and increasingly limited. So what is a couple to do? Perhaps they cannot afford a child but in Texas, there is not readily available contraception and virtually no access to abortion. Should people simply stop having sex? That won’t happen!

I agree, finances should factor into the decision of whether or not to have a child. The reality is that conception is happening regardless of financial status (or even couple status!!). In my opinion, the best states or more pointedly, the best places to have a baby (because there are little oases within what I will call “maternity deserts”, areas that are fairly void of any sort of maternity support or reproductive health care) are places with the following:

  • obstetricians and midwives, and facilities that allow both to perform deliveries
  • birthing facilities that use the least amount of intervention that is safely possible
  • birthing facilities that allow fathers and doulas to be present to support mama during labor and delivery
  • birthing facilities that allow mama to freely move during labor
  • birthing facilities that believe in immediate skin to skin bonding between mother and baby (even before wiping off the vernix, provided there are no health complications in either mother or baby!)
  • birthing facilities that promote breastfeeding and provide immediate and readily available lactation support to new mothers

These characteristics should define whether or not a provider, a hospital or birthing center, a city or town or a state is “best for mama and baby.” The worst state in which to have a baby according to Wallethub.com is Mississippi and yet I would bet that within that state there are a few hospitals or birthing centers that are supportive of childbearing women and offer quality care and support. In addition to financial considerations, prior to pregnancy (or at least prior to birth) mamas and their partners should research health care providers and the health care facilities available to them in their states, cities and communities. For sure some cities will have more resources than others, and some states will have more resources than others. But that doesn’t mean that having an uncomplicated, normal healthy birth is absolutely impossible. It just means that mamas will have to be savvy, do research about what is available and collect as many resources for themselves as possible.

Mamas, be careful what you read. The headline “Vermont is the best place to have a baby” is misleading alone, may have had many mamas ready to relocate and truly doesn’t give mamas and their families tools and tips to evaluate birthing resources and facilities in their area that may in fact be “Mama and Baby Friendly”. I believe that every woman can have a healthy, uncomplicated pregnancy and birth a healthy full term normal weight infant. This is much easier to do in some areas where resources are more readily available than in others, but it is possible none the less. Use the aforementioned list as a guide to evaluating resources and with a bit of research, you too can make your pregnancy, labor and delivery mama and baby friendly-no matter where you live in the United States!

Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond is committed to helping mamas have safe, healthy pregnancies, labors & deliveries and healthy full term babies. If you need help finding resources in your area, e-mail info@mamasonbedrest.com.

References:

Wallethub.com

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Guttmacher Institute

 

Mamas on Bedrest: Beating Back Bedrest Stress-An Interview with Parijat Deshpande

February 9th, 2015

Hello Mamas,

Today we have another powerhouse podcast. Our guest expert is Parijat Deshpande, a Health and Wellness Counselor and Clinical Psychologist. While Parijat’s expertise spans marriage and family counseling, fertility counseling and stress management, she also comes to us as a former Mama on Bedrest and contributor to “From Mamas to Mamas: The Essential Guide to Suriving Bedrest”. Today Parijat is sharing tips and tools to beat back bedrest stress.

Parijat is well versed in stress management and shares a wealth of information on this podcast. Tell us what you think in the comments section below and if you have a question, post it and we’ll get it to her for a response. And don’t forget to read Parijat’s story about her preterm infant in “From Mamas to Mamas: The Essential Guide to Surviving Bedrest”. 

 

Mamas on Bedrest: Additional Resources to Accompany “Hormonal Physiology of Pregnancy” Podcast

January 20th, 2015

Greetings Mamas!

CC.NPWF.HPoC.Report.thumbnailI hope that you have had a chance to listen to our podcast interview with Ms. Carol Sakala, Director of Chilbirth Connection Programs for the National Partnership for Women and Families. In this podcast, Ms. Sakala shares with us the latest comprehensive report put out by Childbirth Connection entitled Hormonal Physiology of Childbearing: Evidence and Implications for Women, Babies, and Maternity Care. This report outlines the hormonal physiology of pregnancy and childbirth and shows how many of the common interventions used during labor and delivery in the United States are not only detrimental to this delicate hormonal balance between mamas and babies, but potentially harmful to them both. They offer practice recommendations for clinicians as well as tips and tools for patients.

There are many documents that both patients and clinicians can download and print for free. These documents are available on the Childbirth Connection website. Below is a very informative infographic which shows the hormonal systems of pregnancy and how many of the common interventions used here in the United States are impairing those systems. It too is available for download and free for clinicians and patients to share. There is also an infographic with more detailed information for clinicians.

CC.NPWF.HPoC.Infographic.Women.2015