Family Support

Mamas on Bedrest: Black Breastfeeding Infographic

August 31st, 2016

Hello Mamas,

As Black Breastfeeding Week wraps up, I am pleased to share with you an infographic that I helped to develop. Hope it helps you have get the vital information you may need to breastfeed!!!Black Breastfeeding Week_Aug 25-31_final

 

Mamas: I’m a staunch Breastfeeding Advocate and Here’s Why.

August 4th, 2016

wbw2016sHello Mamas,

It’s world Breastfeeding week (August 1-6, 2016) and August is Breastfeeding Awareness month.

Some of you are pretty sick of me posting breastfeeding memes and articles on the facebook page and have expressed your displeasure at what you perceive as my “bullying” mamas to breastfeed, and shaming those who have chosen not to breastfeed. I am a breastfeeding advocate to my heart, that I cannot deny. But my passion for women to breastfeed their babies stems from the unequivocal benefits that occur to both mamas and babies when breastfeeding occurs.

When babies breastfeed, they receive cells, hormones, and antibodies in breastmilk which protect them from illness. This protection is unique and changes to meet a baby’s needs as he/she grows. Until a baby receives all of his/her immunizations, they will receive protection via their mama’s antigens via breastmilk. Breastfeeding has also been linked to reduced risks of:

  • Asthma
  • Childhood leukemia
  • Childhood obesity
  • Ear infections
  • Eczema (atopic dermatitis)
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Lower respiratory infections
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis, a disease that affects the gastrointestinal tract in pre-term infants
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • Type 2 diabetes

Likewise, mamas who breastfeed typically (but not always) lose their pregnancy weight faster. Mamas who breastfeed will have reduced uterine bleeding post partum due to the oxytocin released and the increased uterine contractions, and their uteri return to pre-pregnancy size and position sooner than in mamas who do not breastfeed. Breastfeeding also leads to increased bonding between mamas and their infants as they are very close, skin to skin and at times gazing eye to eye. This closeness promotes a sense of safety and security in infants enabling them to feel soothed and less fussy. According to La Leche League, moms who breastfeed sleep more, are less likely to miss work due to illness save money and are at lower risk of several diseases and forms of cancer. Breastfeeding has also been linked to reduced rates of post partum depression and reduced severity in post partum depressive symptoms.

Still, I get it. Many women will not breastfeed their babies, either because they were not able to breastfeed or because they simply did not want to. That is okay. How a woman chooses to feed her child is a very personal decision. But as a clinician and women’s health educator, I would be remiss if I didn’t provide you with the most up to date information and resources so that you can make wise health care choices for yourself and your family and live the healthiest lifestyle possible.

I’m currently working towards the IBCLC credential to become an international board certified lactation consultant. In my training, the most common issue that I see is women not having the support that they need for breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding is natural, but not always easy. Sometimes all a mama needs is guidance and support. You’d be amazed at how simply changing a baby’s position (so that the angle at which their little mouth approaches the breast) will dramatically reduce breastfeeding pain and cracking nipples. Likewise many mamas don’t believe that they are making enough breastmilk to feed their babies and stop thinking that they aren’t feeding their babies enough. Mamas can be reassured their babies are getting enough to eat when they note nursing weights increased after breastfeeding. Additionally, if a baby is healthy, happy and gaining weight appropriately, then a mama can rest assured that she is making a sufficient amount of breastmilk.

While there are numerous books and articles available to guide a new mama on her breastfeeding journey, I am a staunch proponent of breastfeeding consultations (and hence my training!). When a mama is before me, I can see how she holds the baby, how the baby is behaving, how the baby is latching to the breast….And then it is often easy to see the possible obstacles to successful, pain-free breastfeeding and to correct them. Sometimes babies need to more inline with Mamas’ chests and resting babies on a pillow or two makes breastfeeding easier. Sometimes having mama lay on her side and nurse is helpful. And if a mama is having nipple soreness, cracking or has inverted nipples, a nipple shield may prove invaluable to her breastfeeding success.

Mamas, in a perfect world, all mamas would breastfeed their babies. I do believe that many more mamas here in the US would breastfeed or breastfeed longer if their efforts were more accepted and supported. We’re getting there. More businesses are providing areas in which mamas can nurse their babies. Employers are providing areas where mamas can either nurse or pump breastmilk. Many hospitals are obtaining the Baby Friendly designation, a designation that states the hospital is committed to exclusive breastfeeding as the most beneficial infant nutrition and all hospital staff is trained and dedicated to this initiative. NO FORMULA IS PROVIDED IN THE HOSPITAL AND NO FORMULA SAMPLES ARE GIVEN TO MAMAS! Finally, more and more birth workers (like me) are boning up on their breastfeeding skills and making themselves available to help and support mamas. Look for these Breastfeeding Consultants and supports in your area:

IBCLC- International Board Certified Lactation Consultant

CLC-Certified Lactation Consultants

WIC Breastfeeding Counselors

La Leche League

Peer Breastfeeding Counselors

Labor and Delivery Nurses.

It is my mission to help every mama who wants to and is physically able, to have a healthy baby. It is also my mission to help and support her to love and a raise that baby. Breastfeeding is quite possibly the best way for an infant to start out in life. While I know that is is not easy, if a mama wants to breastfeed, I’m here to do everything that I can to help. If you can’t reach one of the above supports, I can assist you. Simply send an e-mail to info@mamasonbedrest.com and we’ll schedule a time to talk and see what you need.

Like what you’ve read? Please share it with other mamas who can benefit. Also, Sign up to receive the latest blog entries directly to your inbox. Simply click the Orange Circle in the upper right hand corner of the webpage. Thanks for reading and joining!!!

Mamas on Bedrest: Why it’s critical that WE celebrate fathers

June 17th, 2015

Hello Mamas,

Father’s Day is this Sunday, June 21st. How are you planning to celebrate the very special man in you and your baby’s life?

Perhaps you are thinking,

“My baby’s father isn’t in our lives!”

I hear you. I am no longer with my children’s father, yet he is an important part of their lives-and mine as we are co-parenting them. But if you have remarried, or there is a “father figure” in your child’s life who has stepped up and stepped in and is fulfilling the role and duties of father, I invite you to celebrate that man this Sunday (and everyday!!)

I know that this website is Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond, and the whole focus is to provide you with the tools and support that you need to have a fantastic pregnancy and a healthy baby. But I would be remiss, and some may even go so far as to say that my actions would be unethical, if I didn’t highlight the important role of fathers-biologic and otherwise-in the lives of birthing women and their babies.

So let’s start with mamas. Fathers/partners provide emotional support throughout the pregnancy. Yeah, sometimes they just don’t get us, but hey, there are times when we don’t get us either! Those who are present are taken on the rollercoaster ride that is pregnancy; full of ups, downs, mood swings, close calls and the joys of labor, delivery and-the baby! As overwhelming as childbearing is for us, imaging how colossal it must be for men?  They have to watch the woman that they love (hopefully) grow, change, be uncomfortable (often times sick!!), be on bed rest, endure the endless tests and treatments and then the grand finale-labor and delivery (or a c-section, major surgery) and be able to do very little to make the situation better for her. For many guys, this is this side of insanity! Guys inherently want to fix things and when it comes to childbearing, after insemination, there really isn’t much for them to do but watch and wait. And yes, for some men, this is too much and they leave. So kudos to those who stay, stick it out and hang in when the going is tough and are a solid rock for their women to lean on and rest upon.

The influence of a father, a daddy (a man who provides more than mere sperm donation!) in the lives of children is priceless. According to the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse, 

“When fathers are involved in the lives of their children, especially their education, their children learn more, perform better in school, and exhibit healthier behavior.”

In 2006, Jeffrey Rosenberg and W. Bradford Wilcox, PhD co-authored a manual on fatherhood through the US Department of Health and Human Services, through the Administration for Children and Families,  the Administration on Children, Youth and Families and the Children’s Bureau Office on Child Abuse and Neglect called, “The Importance of Fathers in the Healthy Development of Children.” In this publication Rosenberg and Wilcox note that children raised by loving, married parents learn how a man is to treat a woman in the context of a healthy relationship. They also note that even when the parents aren’t married and don’t live together, children who see their fathers speaking to and treating their mothers with respect and courtesy learn that men are supposed to treat women with respect and courtesy (boys) and they learn that behavior that is not respectful and courteous is not acceptable (girls). In summary, Rosenberg and Wilcox found the following characteristics in children who had active fathers in their lives (regardless of the parental relationships)

  • Children with involved, caring fathers have better education outcomes that start in preschool and continue throughout their school careers.
  • Children who have an involved father are more likely to be emotionally secure, be confident to explore their surroundings, and, as they grow older, have better social connections with peers. These children also are less likely to get in trouble at home, school, or in the neighborhood.
  • Fathers spend a much higher percentage of their one-on-one interaction with infants and preschoolers in stimulating, playful activity than do mothers. As such, children whose fathers engage in rough housing are more likely to learn to cope with aggressive behaviors and learn its okay to strike out and explore without being anxious.
  • Children with good relationships with their fathers were less likely to experience depression, to exhibit disruptive behavior, or to lie and were more likely to exhibit pro-social behavior.
  • Boys with involved fathers had fewer school behavior problems
  • Girls had stronger self­ esteem.
  • Children who live with their fathers are more likely to have good physical and emotional health, to achieve academically, and to avoid drugs, violence, and delinquent behavior.

What this study also found and what was also confirmed by a study done by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention is that lower income fathers are no less involved in their children’s lives than higher earning dads. In fact, many lower income fathers are more “hands on” with their children, especially those who didn’t live with their children all the time; caring for their children on weekends and for other extended periods of time and providing all the care and nurturing that mothers provide in addition to financial support.

I think that fathers are the unsung heroes of families. Yes, we mamas do much to keep that family moving and shaking, but a good dad really holds the family together. So this Sunday, do a little something special for the dads in you and your children’s lives. And Happy Father’s Day to all the dads!!

 

 

Dad and Me

Me and My Dad, circa 1968.

 

References

The National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse

Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2006). “The Importance of Fathers in the Healthy Development of Children”. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau. Written By Jeffrey Rosenberg and W. Bradford Wilcox, PhD.

20 Reasons Why Your Child Needs You to Be an Active Father Prepared by Stephen D. Green, Ph.D., Child Development Specialist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, October 2000.

The Effects of Father Involvement: An Updated Research Summary of the Evidence Sarah Allen, PhD and Kerry Daly, PhD. Centre for Families, Work & Well-Being, University of Guelph 2007