Research

Mamas on Bedrest: DOULAS SHOUL BE PRESENT AT ALL BIRTHS GLOBALLY!

April 6th, 2017

When people ask me what I think about doulas, I simply say,

“Doulas are an invaluable part of the birthing team and I wish I had had not one but two doulas when I was having my children, especially my daughter! We needed one doula for me and one for my husband!”

Doulas are birth attendants, typically women, who stay with a woman providing support, encouragement and non-medical pain relief and comfort measures to childbearing women during labor, delivery and in the early post partum. The World Health Organization has added their endorsement of birth attendants (doulas) by recommending that, “Birth Attendants be present at ALL BIRTHS GLOBALLY,” as part of the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist Implementation Guide. This is huge, not only for those of us who are doulas and know the invaluable role we play in supporting mothers during pregnancy, labor and delivery and in the immediate post partum period, but also for mothers who may not know about doulas, or who may have been on the fence about getting a doula.

Research on the efficacy of doulas shows that when childbearing women have doulas attend their births they have:

  • Decreased overall cesarean rate (down 50%) and they are less likely to have a cesarean section delivery or other invasive interventions.
  • Shorter labors (decreased 25%)
  • Decreased use of oxytocin by (decreased 40%) a medication used to start or hasten labor.
  • Decreased requests for an epidural or other pain medications by 60%.

Doulas attend to mothers and/or couples primarily during childbirth and in the early post partum period. However, there are ante partum doulas (Mamas on Bedrest & Beyond for example) who attend to mothers who are experiencing complications prenatally and who need additional support. Prenatally doulas offer non-medical supportive care such as helping mothers on bed rest become more comfortable, attending to home duties, offering resources and tips for comfort and support, emotional support, family support, childbirth education, and lactation support and education.

Many people are under the mistaken impression that doulas are only for women having “natural” (vaginal) or home births. Doulas attend all types of births, in all types of settings; home births, hospital births or birthing centers. Additionally, doulas are as beneficial to women having cesarean sections as they are to women having vaginal births. Doulas are particularly under utilized by high risk pregnant women and yet this group stands to benefit the most from the support and emotional care.

Mamas on Bedrest, you can and should consider having a doula present at the delivery of your child-even if the father is present. This well trained, impartial birth professional can act as your advocate and as a bridge to the health care system and to providers when you are unable to advocate for yourself. They can help explain procedures, assist in getting you information on certain proposed procedures and treatments and can help be sure that you are giving informed consent when you sign forms. Doulas are present first and foremost for the mother and the needs of everyone else in the family or on the healthcare team are secondary. Doulas DO NOT MAKE MEDICAL DECISIONS for their clients, but rather hold a space so that a woman and her partner (if present) can determine the best course of treatment for them based on all the available information.

The doula model has been present historically as far back as Biblical times (Exodus 1:15-21) when women of a family or tribe attended to a birthing woman and made sure that her children and husband were fed and cared for. Doulas and Midwives nearly became extinct during the middle and latter part of the 20th century with the advent of hospital labor wards and the specialty of obstetrics. There has been a resurgence in doula use during the latter part of the 20th century and now in to the 21st century. Unfortunately, the use of Doulas has been limited to women of means as they have been the only ones able to pay for a doula as insurance companies have yet to agree to reimbursement.

But there is good news. There are many doula services that offer a sliding scale or are being reimbursed by Medicaid such that ALL women can receive this potentially lifesaving care. In Austin there are the following groups offering low or no cost doula services.

Austin

Giving Austin Labor Support (GALS)– A non-profit organization that supports women with limited or no resources for doula care so that “No woman gives birth alone.”

Mama Sana/Vibrant woman-a grassroots organization of low income women of color serving women in the community with prenatal, birth and post partum reproductive health support.

Outside of Austin, there are several programs around the country serving women from all income backgrounds:

Ancient Song Doula Services– A non-profit organization in Brooklyn New York serving low income women of color.

The Pettaway Pursuit Foundation-Located in Pennsylvania, this non-profit organization specifically attends to high risk pregnant women on prescribed bed rest. A team of contracted doulas provide care and the organization has contracts with several managed care organizations for reimbursement.

Mamatoto Village– This organization also provides very high quality birth assistance and also has its own training program for its staff.

Uzazi Village – This non-profit organization provides doula services to low income women of color in the Greater Kansas City Missouri area, and has another location in St. Louis Missouri. They also provide doula training, childbirth education, reproductive health education and lactation services. They are also now beginning to train midwives.

These are just a few of the organizations that I know of providing doula services. There are others and I am sure many more that I don’t know about. The point I wish to make is that if you would like a doula to attend your birth with you, there is likely a doula organization or solo doula that can help. Mamas, don’t forgo this vital source of support. Doulas really do make births better!

Looking for a doula? e-mail info@mamasonbedrest.com and we’ll do our best to help match you with a doula.

Know of a doula that is excellent at what she does and serves women in need? Share her information here and we’ll start a running list of doulas that are serving low income.

Know of a doula organization that offers services at low or no cost? Let us know so we can share this information.

Did you have a doula at your birth? Please share your experience in the comments section below.

Mamas on Bedrest: Black Breastfeeding Infographic

August 31st, 2016

Hello Mamas,

As Black Breastfeeding Week wraps up, I am pleased to share with you an infographic that I helped to develop. Hope it helps you have get the vital information you may need to breastfeed!!!Black Breastfeeding Week_Aug 25-31_final

 

Mamas on Bedrest: How Does Breastfeeding Help Prevent Breast Cancer-REALLY??

October 14th, 2015

nursing infantHello Mamas!!

I am sure that we are all well aware by now of the benefits of breastfeeding for infants. Human breastmilk is the perfect food for infants because,

  • It has the proper amount of nutrients and adapts to the nutrition needs of the infantIt is easily digested,
  • It requires no preparation or special storage,
  • It is is always the right temperature (when directly from the breast).
  • Babies that are breastfed are less likely to have ear infections
  • Breastfed babies are less likely to have allergies and asthma and if they do have allergies and asthma the conditions tend to be less severe
  • Breastfed babies have a reduced incidence of developing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  • Breastfed children have a lower incidence of obesity

With all of these great benefits for children, you’d think that we here in the US would be jumping through all sorts of hoops to make sure that ALL mamas breastfeed their babies. There has been a lot of information distributed and I think that more mamas are breastfeeding their infants-at least for the first few months of life. However, data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states,

“In 2011, 79% of newborn infants started to breastfeed. Yet breastfeeding did not continue for as long as recommended. Of infants born in 2011, 49% were breastfeeding at 6 months and 27% at 12 months.”

So while we are seeing improvement, we still have a ways to go to reach the Healthy People 2020 goal of approximately 82% of infants being exclusively breastfed at birth. Yet, would these numbers change if mamas knew the benefits of breastfeeding on their health, in particular on their risks of developing breast cancer?

Rachel King, a health education specialist in MD Anderson’s Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center reports:

“Research shows mothers who breastfeed lower their risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer. And, breastfeeding longer than the recommended six months can provide additional protection.”

Most women who breastfeed experience hormonal changes during lactation that delay their menstrual periods. This reduces a woman’s lifetime exposure to estrogen, which can promote breast cancer cell growth. In addition, during pregnancy and breastfeeding, you shed breast tissue. “This shedding can help remove cells with potential DNA damage, thus helping to reduce your chances of developing breast cancer,” King adds.

Breastfeeding also can help lower your ovarian cancer risk by preventing ovulation. And the less you ovulate, the less exposure to estrogen and abnormal ovarian cells that could become cancer.

So EXACTLY how can mamas lower their breast (and ovarian) cancer risks by breastfeeding?

  1. Have their babies before age 30
  2. Breastfeed for at least 6 months
  3. Get education and support from a lactation consultant
  4. Take Breastfeeding classes
  5. Get the support of family, friends and employers
  6. Ask employers for quiet, private places to pump

Breastfeeding is not chic nor a trend. Breastfeeding is the natural way that human babies were intended to be fed. Now we know that breastfeeding is beneficial not only to babies but also protective against breast cancer for mamas. What other incentives do we need? Let’s do this, Mamas!

October is Breast cancer awareness month. Mamas, If you have questions about breast cancer, have a family history of breast cancer or want to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer, start by breastfeeding your infant for at least 6 months. For more information, speak with your health care provider, consult with a lactation consultant and check out the information below (This is just a sample of what is available and what was cited in this post. For sure there is more information available!!). As always, you can post your questions and comments below for a ready reply!

References:

DrWeil.com

MD Anderson Center

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-US Breastfeeding Report Card 2014