Maternity Advocacy

Mamas on Bedrest: Additional Resources to Accompany “Hormonal Physiology of Pregnancy” Podcast

January 20th, 2015

Greetings Mamas!

CC.NPWF.HPoC.Report.thumbnailI hope that you have had a chance to listen to our podcast interview with Ms. Carol Sakala, Director of Chilbirth Connection Programs for the National Partnership for Women and Families. In this podcast, Ms. Sakala shares with us the latest comprehensive report put out by Childbirth Connection entitled Hormonal Physiology of Childbearing: Evidence and Implications for Women, Babies, and Maternity Care. This report outlines the hormonal physiology of pregnancy and childbirth and shows how many of the common interventions used during labor and delivery in the United States are not only detrimental to this delicate hormonal balance between mamas and babies, but potentially harmful to them both. They offer practice recommendations for clinicians as well as tips and tools for patients.

There are many documents that both patients and clinicians can download and print for free. These documents are available on the Childbirth Connection website. Below is a very informative infographic which shows the hormonal systems of pregnancy and how many of the common interventions used here in the United States are impairing those systems. It too is available for download and free for clinicians and patients to share. There is also an infographic with more detailed information for clinicians.

CC.NPWF.HPoC.Infographic.Women.2015

Mamas on Bedrest: Texas earned a “C”. What’s your state’s premature birth grade?

November 18th, 2014

World Prematurity DayHello Mamas,

November 17th is World Prematurity Awareness Day. All over the globe there will be educational events, initiatives, presentations and activities all designed to raise awareness about the very serious problem of prematurity. Premature birth is the leading cause of neonatal death in infants under one year old and each year, 15 million babies die as a result of being born too soon-and are too young and too sick to survive.

Now we are all likely sitting here and thinking, that’s a shame. Those poor babies in developing countries have such a tough road to hoe. Well fasten your seat belts! Despite spending more than most other countries on the planet for health care, The United States has one of the worst rate of premature births of the developed nations. Each year nearly 500,000 infants are born too soon in the US-that’s 1 out of 9 infants!! These numbers are sobering. What’s more, where you are born has a lot to do with your chances of being born prematurely.

Taking a look at the US as a whole, there has been a reduction in the overall rates of preterm labor and premature births. As of this month, the March of Dimes reports rates of premature births (2013 data) has fallen for the 7th straight year to 11.4% and as such, the nation has reached its goal (9.6%) set for Healthy People 2020 7 years early. But when we look at individual states, there is a much different picture. While some states are doing well reducing the number of premature infants born, others are not faring so well. Texas, where I live, currently has a grade of “C”, while my home state of Massachusetts is graded a “B” and only Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Oregon and California earned “A” Grades. Sadly, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Puerto Rico earned “F’s”.

The March of Dimes is working aggressively with state, national and international health representatives to determine what factors are the major reasons babies are born prematurely, and what interventions can be put in place to ameliorate them so that babies won’t be born too soon. The solutions are really pretty simple. It’s not more technology. It’s not more complicated political laws. It’s education. Women need to know that as soon as they become pregnant, they must begin prenatal care. It’s access. Women globally need access to comprehensive, affordable prenatal care. In developing nations as well as in many areas of the United States, women don’t have easy access to health care services. If the nearest health care center is 3 hours away by car and they don’t have a care and no access to any sort of public transportation, they won’t get regular prenatal care! It’s resources. In many rural or economically depressed areas, women simply don’t have the money for food, shelter and prenatal care.  Health care resources may be limited. Access to the midwifery model of care; Attendant care with midwives and doulas which have been shown to reduce the rates of complications and poor birth outcomes, makes these women vulnerable to poor birth outcomes. Breastfeeding Education. Many women still are uneducated about the benefits of breastfeeding, don’t receive breastfeeding education/suppport and don’t have access to pumps.

So how does your state rate? What’s its grade? How is your prenatal care? Let us know in the comments section below. If you need assistance or information, feel free to include that in your comment or write privately to info@mamasobedrest.com

Stepping into the Global Prenatal Initiative on Behalf of Mamas on Bedrest!

May 16th, 2014

Global Prenatal InitiativeGreetings Mamas!!

A few weeks ago (March 21st to be exact) I introduced you to the Global Prenatal Initiative. Well, things have been heating up since that post and I want to give you an update-mainly because I have jumped in with both feet and am involved with organizing the US Prenatal Education Association!

No one is more acutely aware of the shortcomings in US prenatal care than Mamas on Bedrest. While it is safe to say the we receive prenatal care, in many instances one would be loathe to say that it is patient centered, baby friendly or offering a compassionate start to our little ones. And while many of the interventions that Mamas on Bedrest endure are necessary, how they are administered and how Mamas on Bedrest are cared for are often lacking in the compassion and nurturing department.

The foundation principle of the Global Prenatal Initiative is,

“The time spent in the womb is the foundation for long-term health, emotional security, intelligence, creativity and much more for every human being. It is vital that the link between these early stages of human development, their long-term impact and the current global challenges be known.”

~ Julie Gerland, GPI Co-Founder and Director

Dr. Gerland and other members of the United Nations have been collaborating to improve maternity outcomes and have come to the very reasonable conclusion that to make any sort of appreciable impact on our cultural deficiencies and disparities, it is imperative that we focus on human development-namely improving birth outcomes and in turn, life expectancy and quality of life. Their major focuses are:

  1. Confronting family poverty
  2. Ensuring work-family balance
  3. Advancing social integration
  4. Inter-generational solidarity

This is all well and good, but what does this mean for Mamas on Bedrest exactly???

  1. It means empowering mamas about what they can do to feel safe, secure and healthy during pregnancy.
  2. It means empowering mamas to provide safe, secure environments for their babies to develop and grow-both in utero and externally. We have to remember, whatever mama is experiencing during her pregnancy, her baby is also experiencing. As much as possible, we want those experiences to be peaceful and to have positive impacts on baby’s growth and development.
  3. It means working with both parents in the pre-conception and prenatal periods to foster healthy relationships, ones in which as much as possible both parents stay connected (not necessarily married) and involved in the lifelong growth and development of the baby.

Mamas, We already know so much of this! We know what it’s like for our families to face financial challenges because we go on bed rest and are not paid while we are not working. We know what it’s like to lose a job because we go on bed rest! We know what it is like to have to choose to nurture our children on bed rest in lieu of pursuing a career. We know what it is like to try to navigate bed rest without the support of family. We could (wo)man these panels ourselves and give birds eye views of what life is like when we don’t have the resources necessary for a peaceful pregnancies. And while all of you are welcome to step up in support of the Global Prenatal Initiative, I am stepping in and stepping up on behalf of high risk pregnant women, the Mamas on Bedrest. Stepping into this community of global prenatal health workers, it is my intention to not only represent Mamas on Bedrest but to also be your eyes, your ears and most importantly-YOUR VOICE! This is the chance for our voices to be heard, for our stories to be told and for the management of high risk pregnancies to be evaluated and changed as necessary to suit the needs of Mamas on Bedrest. I am counting on you all to speak up! I am counting on you all to tell me exactly what you needed when you were on bed rest; what would have made bed rest bearable and more successful. In return, I will relay your thoughts and request to my colleagues in the association, as well as to the pertinent United Nations sub-committees on human growth, development and overall well being.

The time has come, Mamas! We have the chance to change the course of prenatal care and birth outcomes for generations to come! Most importantly, we have the chance to make much needed changes in the care of high risk pregnancy!